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Maxime

Maxime's Munich Guide

Sights And Attractions
Enclosed I have compiled a list of the most important sights. There are well-known, but also rather unknown ones in the selection. Munich is a city that is completely different by day than by night. Just as it is different in winter than in summer :) A few personal words about Munich and what you should do in Munich: - Drink a good local beer (Tegernseer, Auguster, Hacker-Pschorr), which is brewed according to old tradition. Don't drink Spaten or Löwenbräu they taste like an old shoe and are not real Bavarian beers anymore ;) - Try the local cuisine (schnitzel, roast pork with dumplings and red cabbage or cheese spaetzle) - Enjoy the green spaces in Munich (English Garden, Olympic Park and Court Garden) - Try to understand Bavarian and order a beer according to local tradition ("Ein Helles bitte!"). - All shops and supermarkets close at 20:00. After that you can only shop at the train station or order something (bpsw. via Lieferando). The shops are also not open on Sunday. - Buy a train ticket at the ticket machine or by mobile phone before getting on the subway or tram. After that you can get a fine and there are often no ticket machines on the train. - Walk around the old town at night to enjoy the scenery, Munich is probably the safest world in the world, except from Singapore or the White House I hope this guide will help you to have a great time in Munich =) In case of an emergency you can reach my at my mobile: +4917680826174 Maxime
The Gothic cathedral and city parish church "Zu Unserer Lieben Frau" from the 15th century is and remains the unmistakable landmark of the city. But not everyone knows that the Frauenkirche is the resting place of emperors and that even the devil is said to have come in and gone out here. The over 500 year old brick building is the seat of the archbishop of Munich and Freising. One of the two towers, almost 100 metres high, is accessible and offers a spectacular view of the city.
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Frauenkirche
12 Frauenplatz
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The Gothic cathedral and city parish church "Zu Unserer Lieben Frau" from the 15th century is and remains the unmistakable landmark of the city. But not everyone knows that the Frauenkirche is the resting place of emperors and that even the devil is said to have come in and gone out here. The over 500 year old brick building is the seat of the archbishop of Munich and Freising. One of the two towers, almost 100 metres high, is accessible and offers a spectacular view of the city.
A journey back to the time of the Bavarian monarchy: the extensive park with its park castles, promenades along the castle canal, huge fountains and fountains, magnificent flower piles and, of course, the impressive castle building fascinates Munichers and tourists alike. In addition to the impressive rooms, which were designed by the best sculptors, painters and plasterers of their time, you can also visit several museums in the palace itself, such as the Museum of Man and Nature or the Porcelain Museum.
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นิมเฟนเบิร์ก
1 Schloß Nymphenburg
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A journey back to the time of the Bavarian monarchy: the extensive park with its park castles, promenades along the castle canal, huge fountains and fountains, magnificent flower piles and, of course, the impressive castle building fascinates Munichers and tourists alike. In addition to the impressive rooms, which were designed by the best sculptors, painters and plasterers of their time, you can also visit several museums in the palace itself, such as the Museum of Man and Nature or the Porcelain Museum.
Munich's heart beats here: Marienplatz with the New Town Hall is the world-famous centre of the state capital. Whether it's a daily carillon, a Christmas market in Advent, master celebrations of the big sports clubs or a stroll through the city with amazed visitors from all over the world - there's plenty going on around the Mariensäule (pillar) every season of the year. As the intersection of the east-west axis between Isartor and Karlstor and the south-north axis between Sendlinger Tor and Schwabing, Marienplatz is an ideal starting point for sightseeing tours through Munich. You can also do free-walking tour here without prior sign-up.
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Marienplatz
1 Marienplatz
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Munich's heart beats here: Marienplatz with the New Town Hall is the world-famous centre of the state capital. Whether it's a daily carillon, a Christmas market in Advent, master celebrations of the big sports clubs or a stroll through the city with amazed visitors from all over the world - there's plenty going on around the Mariensäule (pillar) every season of the year. As the intersection of the east-west axis between Isartor and Karlstor and the south-north axis between Sendlinger Tor and Schwabing, Marienplatz is an ideal starting point for sightseeing tours through Munich. You can also do free-walking tour here without prior sign-up.
St. Peter's, the St. Peter's Church behind Marienplatz, is the oldest parish church in Munich. Its tower, which the Munich residents call Old Peter, is one of the best vantage points in the city and also houses Munich's oldest bells and clocks. Not only the tower, but also the impressive baroque high altar and the relics in the glass coffin, the skeleton of the holy Munditia, are worth a visit.
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St. Peter's Church
1 Rindermarkt
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St. Peter's, the St. Peter's Church behind Marienplatz, is the oldest parish church in Munich. Its tower, which the Munich residents call Old Peter, is one of the best vantage points in the city and also houses Munich's oldest bells and clocks. Not only the tower, but also the impressive baroque high altar and the relics in the glass coffin, the skeleton of the holy Munditia, are worth a visit.
The semicircular Karlsplatz, better known as Stachus, is the gateway to Munich's largest pedestrian zone. "It's like the Stachus!" - This saying is known right down to the deepest part of Bavaria and is often used when there is a lot going on somewhere sacred. This is the case day and night at Munich's Stachus: here several S-Bahn, U-Bahn and tram lines, cars, buses, cyclists and pedestrians meet. Some just want to cross the old town, others start their city stroll here in the pedestrian zone. Or go shopping in the Stachus Passagen in the basement.
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Karlsplatz
1 Karlspl.
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The semicircular Karlsplatz, better known as Stachus, is the gateway to Munich's largest pedestrian zone. "It's like the Stachus!" - This saying is known right down to the deepest part of Bavaria and is often used when there is a lot going on somewhere sacred. This is the case day and night at Munich's Stachus: here several S-Bahn, U-Bahn and tram lines, cars, buses, cyclists and pedestrians meet. Some just want to cross the old town, others start their city stroll here in the pedestrian zone. Or go shopping in the Stachus Passagen in the basement.
At Odeonsplatz you live and experience "la dolce vita" in Munich: A church in the Italian late baroque, a loggia after Florentine model and a lot of hustle and bustle. The Odeonsplatz is at the same time the northern boundary of the pedestrian zone and the starting point of Ludwigstrasse. Around the square are the royal residence including the court garden, the Feldherrnhalle, the Theatinerkirche, several city palaces, and the elongated bazaar building. Top events regularly take place on the square, such as the Stadtgründungsfest, the Streetlife Festival or the popular Open Air Classic at Odeonsplatz. The classicist building of the Feldherrnhalle offers a beautiful view of the Odeonsplatz and Ludwigstraße. On sunny days, its steps are a perfect meeting point for ratcheting, eating ice cream and drinking coffee. The building itself is a replica of the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence. It was commissioned by Ludwig I. and completed by Friedrich von Gärtner in 1844 and erected in honour of the Bavarian army. Two large lions from Laaser Mamor stand at the trellis staircase. Inside the hall there are bronze statues of Count Tilly and Prince Wrede as well as the Bavarian Army Monument. The National Socialists chose the Odeonsplatz as a place of march for their propaganda due to a tragic event: On 9 November 1923 right-wing putschists, including Adolf Hitler, moved to the Feldherrnhalle and were violently stopped by the Bavarian state police. The shooting resulted in casualties and deaths on both sides. A commemorative plaque at the Residenz commemorates the four Munich policemen killed today. After the seizure of power in 1933, the "March to the Feldherrnhalle" was repeated every year, together with a memorial service for the shot putschists. On the east side of the Feldherrnhalle a memorial with the names of the dead was attached. Day and night there stood an SS guard of honor, which controlled that every passer-by expressed his appreciation in the form of a Hitler salute. Many Munich residents avoided this part of Residenzstrasse from then on and turned behind the Feldherrnhalle into Viscardigasse, which leads into Theatinerstrasse at the other end. Therefore this small alley is called Drückebergergasserl in Munich.
Odeonsplatz
At Odeonsplatz you live and experience "la dolce vita" in Munich: A church in the Italian late baroque, a loggia after Florentine model and a lot of hustle and bustle. The Odeonsplatz is at the same time the northern boundary of the pedestrian zone and the starting point of Ludwigstrasse. Around the square are the royal residence including the court garden, the Feldherrnhalle, the Theatinerkirche, several city palaces, and the elongated bazaar building. Top events regularly take place on the square, such as the Stadtgründungsfest, the Streetlife Festival or the popular Open Air Classic at Odeonsplatz. The classicist building of the Feldherrnhalle offers a beautiful view of the Odeonsplatz and Ludwigstraße. On sunny days, its steps are a perfect meeting point for ratcheting, eating ice cream and drinking coffee. The building itself is a replica of the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence. It was commissioned by Ludwig I. and completed by Friedrich von Gärtner in 1844 and erected in honour of the Bavarian army. Two large lions from Laaser Mamor stand at the trellis staircase. Inside the hall there are bronze statues of Count Tilly and Prince Wrede as well as the Bavarian Army Monument. The National Socialists chose the Odeonsplatz as a place of march for their propaganda due to a tragic event: On 9 November 1923 right-wing putschists, including Adolf Hitler, moved to the Feldherrnhalle and were violently stopped by the Bavarian state police. The shooting resulted in casualties and deaths on both sides. A commemorative plaque at the Residenz commemorates the four Munich policemen killed today. After the seizure of power in 1933, the "March to the Feldherrnhalle" was repeated every year, together with a memorial service for the shot putschists. On the east side of the Feldherrnhalle a memorial with the names of the dead was attached. Day and night there stood an SS guard of honor, which controlled that every passer-by expressed his appreciation in the form of a Hitler salute. Many Munich residents avoided this part of Residenzstrasse from then on and turned behind the Feldherrnhalle into Viscardigasse, which leads into Theatinerstrasse at the other end. Therefore this small alley is called Drückebergergasserl in Munich.
How the Bavarian princes once lived The tour inside, through the apartments, the festival halls and the court chapels of the Bavarian rulers leads through historical room ensembles - in different epoch styles, as the residence has been continuously extended and rebuilt in its more than 600-year history. Hardly a decade passed without a building site somewhere in or around the Residenz. Today, the state rooms give the visitor an impression of stately living culture and princely representation of past times. Risen from ruins It is hardly noticeable that the Munich Residenz once lay like a dark ruin in the city. It had been badly damaged during the bombing nights of the Second World War and was partly open down to the ground floor. Rain and debris gathered in the magnificent rooms in which Electors and Kings once resided. The performance of those who rebuilt the residence in just a few years was impressive. One can hardly imagine that the yokes of the antiquarium were broken through, the 23,000 square metre roof was destroyed up to 50 square metres and the famous lions of the Residenzstraße - the lucky charms of the Munich residents - were buried in the Brunnenhof to protect them from the bombs. Before that, the residence had been spared destruction for almost 600 years. Over the centuries it grew to immense size in the northeast of the city centre. The starting point of the Wittelsbach residence was the Neuveste, a Gothic moated castle dating from 1385. From New Year's Eve to Renaissance Castle The Neuveste was the refuge of the early dukes, who at that time still resided in the Old Court. However, it soon became too small. The first building of the new residence on Neuveste was to be the first museum north of the Alps: The Antiquarium, completed in 1571. Shortly afterwards the Witwenstock, the Grottenhof and the Schwarze Saal followed. The Brunnenhof also dates from this period. The New Year's Eve had to give way in order to give more room to the decorative Renaissance palace, which was to do justice to the high political standards of the Wittelsbach family. Baroque, Rococo and the Cuvilliés Theatre The most magnificent room sequences in the Munich Residenz were created during the Baroque and Rococo periods. Elaborate decorations, paintings and furniture, silk on the walls and lots of gold give a slight idea of the social and artistic aspirations of the Bavarian rulers. An extremely important extension was built until 1753: The Cuvilliés Theatre. From more than 1,000 trees, felled at Staffelsee, one of the most beautiful rococo theatres in Germany was created. Strong red and lots of gold dominate this four-storey jewel, in which concerts and smaller operas are still performed today. Classical extensions Under Ludwig I, the Residenz was given its present appearance. Until 1842 the mighty Königsbau on Max-Joseph-Platz, its counterpart the Festsaalbau on Hofgarten, the National Theatre and the Allerheiligen-Hofkirche were built. The representative royal apartment of Ludwig I. along the entire royal building is one of the highlights of the visit. Some people might have thought Ludwig was typical when he had a 70 x 17 meter winter garden built, including exotic birds and plants. A nine meter high ton of iron and glass spanned the banqueting hall and on a small artificial lake, high above the roofs of the city, Ludwig let himself float in a swan boat. Anyone who knows the Bavarian kings knows exactly that Ludwig I is no longer meant. No, it is Ludwig II, the fairytale king. The winter garden including the lake is unfortunately only preserved on old photographs, since Prince Regent Luitpold had the construction dismantled in 1897. It was too heavy for the Königsbau - and it dripped through the ceiling into the servants' chambers below. PS: The Four Lions in front of the Residence: An old Munich superstition says that wishes come true when you rub the lion heads' snouts.
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Munich Residenz
1 Residenzstraße
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How the Bavarian princes once lived The tour inside, through the apartments, the festival halls and the court chapels of the Bavarian rulers leads through historical room ensembles - in different epoch styles, as the residence has been continuously extended and rebuilt in its more than 600-year history. Hardly a decade passed without a building site somewhere in or around the Residenz. Today, the state rooms give the visitor an impression of stately living culture and princely representation of past times. Risen from ruins It is hardly noticeable that the Munich Residenz once lay like a dark ruin in the city. It had been badly damaged during the bombing nights of the Second World War and was partly open down to the ground floor. Rain and debris gathered in the magnificent rooms in which Electors and Kings once resided. The performance of those who rebuilt the residence in just a few years was impressive. One can hardly imagine that the yokes of the antiquarium were broken through, the 23,000 square metre roof was destroyed up to 50 square metres and the famous lions of the Residenzstraße - the lucky charms of the Munich residents - were buried in the Brunnenhof to protect them from the bombs. Before that, the residence had been spared destruction for almost 600 years. Over the centuries it grew to immense size in the northeast of the city centre. The starting point of the Wittelsbach residence was the Neuveste, a Gothic moated castle dating from 1385. From New Year's Eve to Renaissance Castle The Neuveste was the refuge of the early dukes, who at that time still resided in the Old Court. However, it soon became too small. The first building of the new residence on Neuveste was to be the first museum north of the Alps: The Antiquarium, completed in 1571. Shortly afterwards the Witwenstock, the Grottenhof and the Schwarze Saal followed. The Brunnenhof also dates from this period. The New Year's Eve had to give way in order to give more room to the decorative Renaissance palace, which was to do justice to the high political standards of the Wittelsbach family. Baroque, Rococo and the Cuvilliés Theatre The most magnificent room sequences in the Munich Residenz were created during the Baroque and Rococo periods. Elaborate decorations, paintings and furniture, silk on the walls and lots of gold give a slight idea of the social and artistic aspirations of the Bavarian rulers. An extremely important extension was built until 1753: The Cuvilliés Theatre. From more than 1,000 trees, felled at Staffelsee, one of the most beautiful rococo theatres in Germany was created. Strong red and lots of gold dominate this four-storey jewel, in which concerts and smaller operas are still performed today. Classical extensions Under Ludwig I, the Residenz was given its present appearance. Until 1842 the mighty Königsbau on Max-Joseph-Platz, its counterpart the Festsaalbau on Hofgarten, the National Theatre and the Allerheiligen-Hofkirche were built. The representative royal apartment of Ludwig I. along the entire royal building is one of the highlights of the visit. Some people might have thought Ludwig was typical when he had a 70 x 17 meter winter garden built, including exotic birds and plants. A nine meter high ton of iron and glass spanned the banqueting hall and on a small artificial lake, high above the roofs of the city, Ludwig let himself float in a swan boat. Anyone who knows the Bavarian kings knows exactly that Ludwig I is no longer meant. No, it is Ludwig II, the fairytale king. The winter garden including the lake is unfortunately only preserved on old photographs, since Prince Regent Luitpold had the construction dismantled in 1897. It was too heavy for the Königsbau - and it dripped through the ceiling into the servants' chambers below. PS: The Four Lions in front of the Residence: An old Munich superstition says that wishes come true when you rub the lion heads' snouts.
The world's largest museum of technology: the Deutsches Museum von Meisterwerken der Naturwissenschaft und Technik, as it is officially called, is both an exhibition space and a huge playground. Visitors can turn knobs, flip levers and switches, and touch many exhibits. There are around 50 thematic areas ranging from agricultural and food technology to astronomy, chemistry, photography & film, aerospace, marine research and physics, as well as shipping, telecommunications and timekeeping.
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Deutsches Museum
1 Museumsinsel
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The world's largest museum of technology: the Deutsches Museum von Meisterwerken der Naturwissenschaft und Technik, as it is officially called, is both an exhibition space and a huge playground. Visitors can turn knobs, flip levers and switches, and touch many exhibits. There are around 50 thematic areas ranging from agricultural and food technology to astronomy, chemistry, photography & film, aerospace, marine research and physics, as well as shipping, telecommunications and timekeeping.
The Olympic Park is one of the most impressive and popular places in Munich. Created on the occasion of the 1972 Olympic Games, it is home to some of the state capital's most important buildings: the Olympic Stadium and the Olympic Hall with its world-famous tent roof construction and the 290-metre-high Olympic Tower with its viewing platform. In addition, the 850,000 square metre park offers a varied range of leisure activities with concerts, spectacular events, festivals and a variety of sports activities.
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Olympiapark
21 Spiridon-Louis-Ring
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The Olympic Park is one of the most impressive and popular places in Munich. Created on the occasion of the 1972 Olympic Games, it is home to some of the state capital's most important buildings: the Olympic Stadium and the Olympic Hall with its world-famous tent roof construction and the 290-metre-high Olympic Tower with its viewing platform. In addition, the 850,000 square metre park offers a varied range of leisure activities with concerts, spectacular events, festivals and a variety of sports activities.
BMW Welt is the Munich car manufacturer's experience and delivery centre. This is where the company's history and future meet. All brands of the BMW Group are represented and can be scrutinised by the visitors. There are also guided tours, restaurants and souvenir shops. In 2007, BMW Welt opened its doors to the public in the immediate vicinity of the corporate headquarters, the main plant and the BMW Museum. With its unmistakable, futuristic architecture, it is also extremely worth seeing from the outside.
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BMW Welt
1 Am Olympiapark
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BMW Welt is the Munich car manufacturer's experience and delivery centre. This is where the company's history and future meet. All brands of the BMW Group are represented and can be scrutinised by the visitors. There are also guided tours, restaurants and souvenir shops. In 2007, BMW Welt opened its doors to the public in the immediate vicinity of the corporate headquarters, the main plant and the BMW Museum. With its unmistakable, futuristic architecture, it is also extremely worth seeing from the outside.
As one of the most important art galleries in the world, the Alte Pinakothek on Königsplatz shows European painting from the 14th to the 18th century. More than 700 paintings are exhibited in 19 halls and 47 cabinets. Since 1836, art enthusiasts have been walking through the impressive two-storey rooms created by the architect Leo von Klenze. The treasures of the Alte Pinakothek are kept by the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen. Together with the Neue Pinakothek, the Pinakothek der Moderne and the Museum Brandhorst, the Alte Pinakothek forms the inner core of the Munich art area.
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Alte Pinakothek
27 Barer Str.
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As one of the most important art galleries in the world, the Alte Pinakothek on Königsplatz shows European painting from the 14th to the 18th century. More than 700 paintings are exhibited in 19 halls and 47 cabinets. Since 1836, art enthusiasts have been walking through the impressive two-storey rooms created by the architect Leo von Klenze. The treasures of the Alte Pinakothek are kept by the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen. Together with the Neue Pinakothek, the Pinakothek der Moderne and the Museum Brandhorst, the Alte Pinakothek forms the inner core of the Munich art area.
Visitors pass through the Neue Pinakothek like in a labyrinth. The tour follows a horizontal eight and ends at the starting point. In between there is an exciting overview of the epochs of European art from the Enlightenment to the beginning of Modernism. Van Gogh's Sunflowers, Spitzwegs Armer Poet, Piloty's 35 square metre triumphal procession of Germanicus and King Ludwig I in full Ornat are just a few examples of the nearly 400 works of European art from the late 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries. (Attention: the Neue Pinakothek will be closed from 31.12.2018 for structural reasons)
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Neue Pinakothek
29 Barer Str.
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Visitors pass through the Neue Pinakothek like in a labyrinth. The tour follows a horizontal eight and ends at the starting point. In between there is an exciting overview of the epochs of European art from the Enlightenment to the beginning of Modernism. Van Gogh's Sunflowers, Spitzwegs Armer Poet, Piloty's 35 square metre triumphal procession of Germanicus and King Ludwig I in full Ornat are just a few examples of the nearly 400 works of European art from the late 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries. (Attention: the Neue Pinakothek will be closed from 31.12.2018 for structural reasons)
Yes, there is another Pinakothek :) Four museums under one roof: The Pinakothek der Moderne is one of Munich's biggest attractions and one of the most famous exhibition halls in the world. On an area of over 12,000 square meters, it unites four independent museums that cover various areas of art in a unique constellation: the Collection of Modern Art of the Bavarian State Painting Collections, the New Collection of the Munich Design Museum, the Architekturmuseum der TU München and the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung.
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Pinakothek der Moderne
40 Barer Str.
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Yes, there is another Pinakothek :) Four museums under one roof: The Pinakothek der Moderne is one of Munich's biggest attractions and one of the most famous exhibition halls in the world. On an area of over 12,000 square meters, it unites four independent museums that cover various areas of art in a unique constellation: the Collection of Modern Art of the Bavarian State Painting Collections, the New Collection of the Munich Design Museum, the Architekturmuseum der TU München and the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung.
A journey around the world: Munich's Hellabrunn Zoo was founded in 1911 and is considered the world's first geo-zoo. Since 1928, the animals have been living here sorted by continent - today partly in natural communities as well as in nature. At any time of the year, the zoo offers an impressive picture of the natural habitats of the Isar floodplain landscape conservation area through changing moods. Without disturbing grids and fences, visitors can observe the animals and at the same time learn a lot about species and environmental protection.
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Münchener Tierpark Hellabrunn
30 Tierparkstr.
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A journey around the world: Munich's Hellabrunn Zoo was founded in 1911 and is considered the world's first geo-zoo. Since 1928, the animals have been living here sorted by continent - today partly in natural communities as well as in nature. At any time of the year, the zoo offers an impressive picture of the natural habitats of the Isar floodplain landscape conservation area through changing moods. Without disturbing grids and fences, visitors can observe the animals and at the same time learn a lot about species and environmental protection.
The Bavarian State Opera looks back on a 350-year history and is at the same time one of the largest artistic-musical companies in the world. In the 17th century, Elector Ferdinand Maria built a hall theatre in the Hercules Hall of the Residenz in which the first Italian opera performances were staged in front of the Court Society. Since 1811, the Bavarian State Opera has been housed in the newly built National Theatre on Max-Joseph-Platz, Germany's largest opera house to date, and has enjoyed great success with more than half a million visitors and around 450 performances in one season.
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Bayerische Staatsoper
2 Max-Joseph-Platz
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The Bavarian State Opera looks back on a 350-year history and is at the same time one of the largest artistic-musical companies in the world. In the 17th century, Elector Ferdinand Maria built a hall theatre in the Hercules Hall of the Residenz in which the first Italian opera performances were staged in front of the Court Society. Since 1811, the Bavarian State Opera has been housed in the newly built National Theatre on Max-Joseph-Platz, Germany's largest opera house to date, and has enjoyed great success with more than half a million visitors and around 450 performances in one season.
Where emperors once resided, visitors can now shop or taste wine. Those who walk down Burgstraße from Marienplatz past the facades of magnificent town houses will reach the Old Court through a gate. Although many parts of the building are only reconstructions, the traffic-calmed inner courtyard immediately takes you back to earlier centuries. Until the 15th century, the courtyard was the residence of the rulers of Wittelsbach. When the new Munich Residence was built in 1385, the Old Court lost its importance and became the seat of the financial authorities. In the vaulted cellar, the free permanent exhibition on Munich's Imperial Castle provides interesting information on history.
Alter Hof
1 Alter Hof
Where emperors once resided, visitors can now shop or taste wine. Those who walk down Burgstraße from Marienplatz past the facades of magnificent town houses will reach the Old Court through a gate. Although many parts of the building are only reconstructions, the traffic-calmed inner courtyard immediately takes you back to earlier centuries. Until the 15th century, the courtyard was the residence of the rulers of Wittelsbach. When the new Munich Residence was built in 1385, the Old Court lost its importance and became the seat of the financial authorities. In the vaulted cellar, the free permanent exhibition on Munich's Imperial Castle provides interesting information on history.
It is Munich's largest market and for quite a few long-established residents the "good room of the city". The 22,000 square metre Viktualienmarkt offers a huge range of fresh produce and much more than "just" fruit and vegetables: bakers, butchers, fishmongers, delicatessens and flower stands have made the market Munich's landmark for over 200 years. And one that can be visited without admission. There are also snack stands and a cosy beer garden with a maypole.
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Victuals Market
3 Viktualienmarkt
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It is Munich's largest market and for quite a few long-established residents the "good room of the city". The 22,000 square metre Viktualienmarkt offers a huge range of fresh produce and much more than "just" fruit and vegetables: bakers, butchers, fishmongers, delicatessens and flower stands have made the market Munich's landmark for over 200 years. And one that can be visited without admission. There are also snack stands and a cosy beer garden with a maypole.
Alter Botanischer Garten means “Old botanical garden” (with the garden in Nymphenburg being the “new” one) and it dates back to 1812. It is a small garden that lies between Karlplatz-Stachus and the Central Train Station, easily accessible on foot. It is literally a small oasis in the heart of the city, great to relax and have a break, get some sun, enjoy your ice-cream or simply lie down next to the central fountain, the Neptun-Brunnen. I love leaving the noise of the city behind and getting lost in the “forest-like” vegetation – and being able to return to the hassle of the city centre in less than a minute. Originally the garden was a pure botanical garden, designed by the architect Friedrich Ludwig von Sckell, built in D-form with the greenhouse of the tropical plants being in the north area of the garden. In 1914, the new botanical garden close to Nymphenburg palace was built and the old botanical garden was redesigned to be the park that it is today. As a reminder of the botanical past of the garden, one can still see many exotic plants. The Kunstpavillon in the middle of the garden, destroyed during the Second World War and rebuilt, hosts exhibitions and art events, while the Parkcafé has a beautiful and relaxing Biergarten.
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Alter Botanischer Garten
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Alter Botanischer Garten means “Old botanical garden” (with the garden in Nymphenburg being the “new” one) and it dates back to 1812. It is a small garden that lies between Karlplatz-Stachus and the Central Train Station, easily accessible on foot. It is literally a small oasis in the heart of the city, great to relax and have a break, get some sun, enjoy your ice-cream or simply lie down next to the central fountain, the Neptun-Brunnen. I love leaving the noise of the city behind and getting lost in the “forest-like” vegetation – and being able to return to the hassle of the city centre in less than a minute. Originally the garden was a pure botanical garden, designed by the architect Friedrich Ludwig von Sckell, built in D-form with the greenhouse of the tropical plants being in the north area of the garden. In 1914, the new botanical garden close to Nymphenburg palace was built and the old botanical garden was redesigned to be the park that it is today. As a reminder of the botanical past of the garden, one can still see many exotic plants. The Kunstpavillon in the middle of the garden, destroyed during the Second World War and rebuilt, hosts exhibitions and art events, while the Parkcafé has a beautiful and relaxing Biergarten.
This building just fascinates me every time I cycle past because it stands out from its urban surroundings. At first I thought it was an old farmer’s house and I imagined the green meadows around it. But in fact this was not true at all as it is one of the “Herbergshäuser“. Poor day labourers who could not afford to live in town settled across the river where they were allowed, at least at the beginning, to build homes on the cheap flood land. The homes could be several storeys high and sometimes had more entrance doors than windows to ensure it could be shared by as many families as possible. In 1600 there were 180 houses in the Au. The area soon became unstoppably poor as too many people from the countryside were forced to try their luck in the city. After years of illegal hostel house constructing the Au had become a chaotic slum which left the officials without any choice but suburbanise the area to get a grip on the situation. The Kriechbaumhof, an original baroque hostel house and the last of its kind was removed in 1974, stored and rebuilt at a different site in 1984. It now belongs to the German alpinists club (DAV) and can be hired for private functions or seminars. It is located direclty between the “Preysinggarten” and the “Zum Kloster” so if you go to one of the places have a look. It's not a must-see but if you want to have a nice stroll, go for it.
Kriechbaumhof (KBH, Vereinsheim des DAV)
73 Preysingstraße
This building just fascinates me every time I cycle past because it stands out from its urban surroundings. At first I thought it was an old farmer’s house and I imagined the green meadows around it. But in fact this was not true at all as it is one of the “Herbergshäuser“. Poor day labourers who could not afford to live in town settled across the river where they were allowed, at least at the beginning, to build homes on the cheap flood land. The homes could be several storeys high and sometimes had more entrance doors than windows to ensure it could be shared by as many families as possible. In 1600 there were 180 houses in the Au. The area soon became unstoppably poor as too many people from the countryside were forced to try their luck in the city. After years of illegal hostel house constructing the Au had become a chaotic slum which left the officials without any choice but suburbanise the area to get a grip on the situation. The Kriechbaumhof, an original baroque hostel house and the last of its kind was removed in 1974, stored and rebuilt at a different site in 1984. It now belongs to the German alpinists club (DAV) and can be hired for private functions or seminars. It is located direclty between the “Preysinggarten” and the “Zum Kloster” so if you go to one of the places have a look. It's not a must-see but if you want to have a nice stroll, go for it.
The beer garden Chinesischer Turm is located in the English Garden (Englischer Garten), Munich's largest park area. With a size of 417 hectares, the English Garden is larger than Hyde Park in London or Central Park in New York. Due to its close distance to the university, the beer garden often attracts a young crowd, mixed with park visitor including many tourists. In 1789, on Great Elector Karl Theodor's initiative, the creation of the English Garden began with his plan to convert a former hunting area located at the Isar into a recreational nature. In 1790 the Chinese Tower (Chinesischer Turm) was built. The Chinese Tower is a pagoda-style, all-wooden tower with five storeys. The 25-metre tall tower has a diameter of 19 metres at ground level and six metres at its top level. The Chinese Tower was destroyed during World War II in 1944. In 1952 the tower was rebuilt to its original and current style. The Chinesischer Turm beer garden is the second largest beer garden in Munich and has about 7,000 seats in the self-serviced area and about 500 seats in the serviced area. Guests in the self-serviced area can sit on regular beer garden benches, some of which have back rests. The benches are arranged around the tower. The food stalls offer traditional beer garden food such as Steckerlfisch (grilled fish on a stick), Hendl (roasted chicken), Schweinshaxn (roasted pork knuckle), Obatzda and Auszogne. The beer served is Hofbräu and a Maß Hell (lager) costs €7.90 (May 2016). A highlight of Chinesischer Turm is the yearly Kocherlball which is held in memory of the cooks and servants of the noble families of the 19th century. In the late 19th century, up to 5,000 Munich servants met during the summer months every Saturday morning for a dance at the Chinese Tower. Usually they met before work between 4am and 5am. Today the Kocherlball takes place on the 3rd Sunday in July between 5.30am to 10am (if the weather is bad a week later). The ball attracts thousands of participants, many of which wear historical outfits and Bavarian costumes. Depending on the weather, the beer garden is open from 10am to 11pm. In Winter, End of November till December, 23rd, a christmas market is held here. PS: Don't eat there anything except a Brezl because the food is not the best ;) Rather go for a Beer!
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Restaurant and Beer Garden at the Chinese Tower
3 Englischer Garten
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The beer garden Chinesischer Turm is located in the English Garden (Englischer Garten), Munich's largest park area. With a size of 417 hectares, the English Garden is larger than Hyde Park in London or Central Park in New York. Due to its close distance to the university, the beer garden often attracts a young crowd, mixed with park visitor including many tourists. In 1789, on Great Elector Karl Theodor's initiative, the creation of the English Garden began with his plan to convert a former hunting area located at the Isar into a recreational nature. In 1790 the Chinese Tower (Chinesischer Turm) was built. The Chinese Tower is a pagoda-style, all-wooden tower with five storeys. The 25-metre tall tower has a diameter of 19 metres at ground level and six metres at its top level. The Chinese Tower was destroyed during World War II in 1944. In 1952 the tower was rebuilt to its original and current style. The Chinesischer Turm beer garden is the second largest beer garden in Munich and has about 7,000 seats in the self-serviced area and about 500 seats in the serviced area. Guests in the self-serviced area can sit on regular beer garden benches, some of which have back rests. The benches are arranged around the tower. The food stalls offer traditional beer garden food such as Steckerlfisch (grilled fish on a stick), Hendl (roasted chicken), Schweinshaxn (roasted pork knuckle), Obatzda and Auszogne. The beer served is Hofbräu and a Maß Hell (lager) costs €7.90 (May 2016). A highlight of Chinesischer Turm is the yearly Kocherlball which is held in memory of the cooks and servants of the noble families of the 19th century. In the late 19th century, up to 5,000 Munich servants met during the summer months every Saturday morning for a dance at the Chinese Tower. Usually they met before work between 4am and 5am. Today the Kocherlball takes place on the 3rd Sunday in July between 5.30am to 10am (if the weather is bad a week later). The ball attracts thousands of participants, many of which wear historical outfits and Bavarian costumes. Depending on the weather, the beer garden is open from 10am to 11pm. In Winter, End of November till December, 23rd, a christmas market is held here. PS: Don't eat there anything except a Brezl because the food is not the best ;) Rather go for a Beer!
Gastroszene
A selection of my favorite restaurants, cafes, and bars :)
In Munich's Hofbräuhaus am Platzl, great importance is attached to cosiness and rituals around the golden barley juice. The regional cuisine, music and folk dances, waiters in traditional costumes and the historical atmosphere inspire thousands of Munich residents and visitors from all over the world every day. Even though the Munich original has already been rebuilt in Las Vegas and other cities, the imposing Neo-Renaissance building on the Platzl remains unique. Inside, up to 3000 visitors are entertained, outside in the beer garden under the open sky up to 400 guests. The gates are open daily from 9 a.m. and there is no rest day. Even on Christmas Eve beer and Bavarian delicacies await you.
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ฮอฟบราวเฮาส์
9 Platzl
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In Munich's Hofbräuhaus am Platzl, great importance is attached to cosiness and rituals around the golden barley juice. The regional cuisine, music and folk dances, waiters in traditional costumes and the historical atmosphere inspire thousands of Munich residents and visitors from all over the world every day. Even though the Munich original has already been rebuilt in Las Vegas and other cities, the imposing Neo-Renaissance building on the Platzl remains unique. Inside, up to 3000 visitors are entertained, outside in the beer garden under the open sky up to 400 guests. The gates are open daily from 9 a.m. and there is no rest day. Even on Christmas Eve beer and Bavarian delicacies await you.
www.zur-schandgeige.de Medieval tavern "Zur Schandgeige" (The shameful violin) since 2007 in Schwabing-West. In the vault, you can dive into another world to escape the stress of everyday life with a cup of mead and all kinds of delicious food
Taverne zur Schandgeige
36 Elisabethstraße
www.zur-schandgeige.de Medieval tavern "Zur Schandgeige" (The shameful violin) since 2007 in Schwabing-West. In the vault, you can dive into another world to escape the stress of everyday life with a cup of mead and all kinds of delicious food
www.dompierre.de Boulangerie Dompierre | The best French Bakery in Munich It's directly around the corner and the best bakery in Munich. The coffee is from another world! If you have some time, take a newspaper and go for a coffee and a croissant there!
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Boulangerie Dompierre - Tengstr.
31 Tengstraße
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www.dompierre.de Boulangerie Dompierre | The best French Bakery in Munich It's directly around the corner and the best bakery in Munich. The coffee is from another world! If you have some time, take a newspaper and go for a coffee and a croissant there!
Around 1900, Schwabing was the centre of the bohemian artists' life: the artists settled not far from the Academy of Fine Arts and Anton Azbé's painting school: Wassily Kandinsky and Gabriele Münter lived in the Georgenhof during their romance. In the seventies, the inn became a modern, elegant barbecue room and in the summer of 2008 a new phase began: completely renovated by the owner Augustinerbräu and under new management, the Georgenhof shone in new splendour. Appetite for hearty roast pork or homemade Obatzda with red onions and pickles? Or a wild herb salad with caramelized goat cheese tart? To a cosy afternoon in the beer garden or a light, fast business lunch in our restaurant? If yes, go there :) My favorite dish is a Schnitzel or game meat!
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Georgenhof
1 Friedrichstraße
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Around 1900, Schwabing was the centre of the bohemian artists' life: the artists settled not far from the Academy of Fine Arts and Anton Azbé's painting school: Wassily Kandinsky and Gabriele Münter lived in the Georgenhof during their romance. In the seventies, the inn became a modern, elegant barbecue room and in the summer of 2008 a new phase began: completely renovated by the owner Augustinerbräu and under new management, the Georgenhof shone in new splendour. Appetite for hearty roast pork or homemade Obatzda with red onions and pickles? Or a wild herb salad with caramelized goat cheese tart? To a cosy afternoon in the beer garden or a light, fast business lunch in our restaurant? If yes, go there :) My favorite dish is a Schnitzel or game meat!
As a local I would generally avoid the area around Marienplatz (with a few exceptions), as it is way too touristic and full of bad and overpriced restaurants. However, this well-known place is quite a gem and offers an amazing view over the city center, as well as the New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus in German). The highlight (as you have probably guessed from the name of the café) is that you can watch the Rathaus-Glockenspiel from a very nice point of view. Also the restaurant is very romantic and has a nice ambiance, so it’s a great place for a date night. My girlfriend and I discovered it exactly this way by chance, by asking our friends for a romantic place in Munich to have dinner. As the restaurant is open the whole day, you can also visit and have breakfast, brunch, lunch and just coffee and cakes. The menu is changing, but expect an international/European food selection. Keep in mind that the price level has a premium due to location, and always reserve a table in advance.
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Cafe Glockenspiel GmbH
28 Marienplatz
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As a local I would generally avoid the area around Marienplatz (with a few exceptions), as it is way too touristic and full of bad and overpriced restaurants. However, this well-known place is quite a gem and offers an amazing view over the city center, as well as the New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus in German). The highlight (as you have probably guessed from the name of the café) is that you can watch the Rathaus-Glockenspiel from a very nice point of view. Also the restaurant is very romantic and has a nice ambiance, so it’s a great place for a date night. My girlfriend and I discovered it exactly this way by chance, by asking our friends for a romantic place in Munich to have dinner. As the restaurant is open the whole day, you can also visit and have breakfast, brunch, lunch and just coffee and cakes. The menu is changing, but expect an international/European food selection. Keep in mind that the price level has a premium due to location, and always reserve a table in advance.
Wirtshaus in der Au – Dumpling paradise A lot of people who visit Munich would like to try typical food – so this is my suggestion for a Bavarian style restaurant. The menu contains all the usual “Schmankerl” (goodies) from this part of Germany. But there are a few things which distinguish the Wirtshaus in der Au from most typical restaurants: There is also a seasonal menu on offer with, for instance, white asparagus dishes in spring time or goose roast around Saint Martin’s day which is on the 11 November. Saint Martin was once whistle-blown by some pertly geese and apparently this makes them a very popular meal that day. After you have eaten at the Wirtshaus ask for a schnapps. The waiter will present a rack with different bottles and you pick from apricot, damson or rowan berry schnapps to name but a few. As opposed to a lot of traditional places the Wirtshaus also attracts a younger crowd. Every month various events such as Jazz concerts or Waltz dancing evenings take place and they do a summer party in August where people can wear their traditional costumes. And here is my favourite thing: you can book yourself into a dumpling cookery course. So if you want to impress your friends a bit more do not only bring back a stein from the Oktoberfest but also serve a roast accompanied by homemade Bavarian dumplings.
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Wirtshaus in der Au
51 Lilienstraße
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Wirtshaus in der Au – Dumpling paradise A lot of people who visit Munich would like to try typical food – so this is my suggestion for a Bavarian style restaurant. The menu contains all the usual “Schmankerl” (goodies) from this part of Germany. But there are a few things which distinguish the Wirtshaus in der Au from most typical restaurants: There is also a seasonal menu on offer with, for instance, white asparagus dishes in spring time or goose roast around Saint Martin’s day which is on the 11 November. Saint Martin was once whistle-blown by some pertly geese and apparently this makes them a very popular meal that day. After you have eaten at the Wirtshaus ask for a schnapps. The waiter will present a rack with different bottles and you pick from apricot, damson or rowan berry schnapps to name but a few. As opposed to a lot of traditional places the Wirtshaus also attracts a younger crowd. Every month various events such as Jazz concerts or Waltz dancing evenings take place and they do a summer party in August where people can wear their traditional costumes. And here is my favourite thing: you can book yourself into a dumpling cookery course. So if you want to impress your friends a bit more do not only bring back a stein from the Oktoberfest but also serve a roast accompanied by homemade Bavarian dumplings.
Schwarzer Dackel – Laid-back drinks and dachshunds Where you can find the bar Schwarzer Dackel (“black dachshund” in English) today, there used to be a typical Bavarian pub – or “Boazn” as the locals say. Part of that stays alive in the interior of Schwarzer Dackel:the tiles are from the ’60s and the bar itself is still the original one – but it was customized with a sparkling special effects lacquer. But not only is the interior something special – the drinks are, also. The barkeeper learned from the best in Munich, and whatever you order, you can be sure it will be a fine drink. If you prefer beer, you can choose from the tap or the selection of craft beer. Schwarzer Dackel just opened in summer 2018 but it is already one of my favorite bars in Munich. I love going there for afterwork drinks with my colleagues and also with friends on the weekends. I can especially recommend it in summer: It’s super chilled to just gather outside Schwarzer Dackel with a beer on the sidewalk and enjoy the summer vibes. But also when the days are getting colder Schwarzer Dackel is the place to go: there are DJs performing on the weekends and there’s a shuffleboard for a fun but laid-back night out. Whenever you go there, make sure to check out the customized dachshund beer mats – there are new ones every week!
Schwarzer Dackel
158 Schwanthalerstraße
Schwarzer Dackel – Laid-back drinks and dachshunds Where you can find the bar Schwarzer Dackel (“black dachshund” in English) today, there used to be a typical Bavarian pub – or “Boazn” as the locals say. Part of that stays alive in the interior of Schwarzer Dackel:the tiles are from the ’60s and the bar itself is still the original one – but it was customized with a sparkling special effects lacquer. But not only is the interior something special – the drinks are, also. The barkeeper learned from the best in Munich, and whatever you order, you can be sure it will be a fine drink. If you prefer beer, you can choose from the tap or the selection of craft beer. Schwarzer Dackel just opened in summer 2018 but it is already one of my favorite bars in Munich. I love going there for afterwork drinks with my colleagues and also with friends on the weekends. I can especially recommend it in summer: It’s super chilled to just gather outside Schwarzer Dackel with a beer on the sidewalk and enjoy the summer vibes. But also when the days are getting colder Schwarzer Dackel is the place to go: there are DJs performing on the weekends and there’s a shuffleboard for a fun but laid-back night out. Whenever you go there, make sure to check out the customized dachshund beer mats – there are new ones every week!
When you believed James Bond to be extravagant, ordering his martinis shaken, not stirred, you’d definitely never been to Zephyr Bar. Certainly, there are lots of places in Munich where excellent cocktails are served. But drinking perfectly mixed Margaritas, Cosmopolitans and Daiquiris can become a bit dull after a while – and there’s not much to mix and shake in these recipes anyway. Thankfully, the high art of cocktail making is on the comeback – revived by the trend of retro prohibition bars popping up all around the United States. The Zephyr Bar can be seen in that tradition, but instead of masquerading itself in vintage, roaring 20s style, the focus is totally on the drinks. Whereas the room is kept quite simple – grey walls, unexciting plain seating – the bar itself is the center of decadence and indulgence. Bottles of super rare and exotic origins, antique soda siphons and silver cocktail stirrers, passion fruits, strawberries, meringues, lavender, herbs and flowers are overflowing the shelves and racks. Sometimes I even wonder if I entered a botanical garden, an ancient chemistry lab or a cabinet of wonder by mistake. Taking a nip from my Pink Paloma, I witness all the cocktail magic going on, talk shop with the bartenders (super friendly guys who know their business) and am astonished by the outré ingredients conjured to the drinks. Zephyr Bar is not the kind of place to go for the conventional, but where wild roses grow by surprise.
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Zephyr Bar
68 Baaderstraße
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When you believed James Bond to be extravagant, ordering his martinis shaken, not stirred, you’d definitely never been to Zephyr Bar. Certainly, there are lots of places in Munich where excellent cocktails are served. But drinking perfectly mixed Margaritas, Cosmopolitans and Daiquiris can become a bit dull after a while – and there’s not much to mix and shake in these recipes anyway. Thankfully, the high art of cocktail making is on the comeback – revived by the trend of retro prohibition bars popping up all around the United States. The Zephyr Bar can be seen in that tradition, but instead of masquerading itself in vintage, roaring 20s style, the focus is totally on the drinks. Whereas the room is kept quite simple – grey walls, unexciting plain seating – the bar itself is the center of decadence and indulgence. Bottles of super rare and exotic origins, antique soda siphons and silver cocktail stirrers, passion fruits, strawberries, meringues, lavender, herbs and flowers are overflowing the shelves and racks. Sometimes I even wonder if I entered a botanical garden, an ancient chemistry lab or a cabinet of wonder by mistake. Taking a nip from my Pink Paloma, I witness all the cocktail magic going on, talk shop with the bartenders (super friendly guys who know their business) and am astonished by the outré ingredients conjured to the drinks. Zephyr Bar is not the kind of place to go for the conventional, but where wild roses grow by surprise.
In every student’s life, there comes a time when things get hectic and stressful: by surprisingly fast-approaching deadlines of unloved essay assignments, growing piles of unread books for class, neglected group presentations or threatening exams. What students in Munich tend to do in such situations of academic student angst, is to enclose themselves in one of the university libraries in order to finally get work done. But there is one essential problem: you’re not allowed to bring coffee to the library! So people a more than thrilled about the newly opened “Lost Weekend”, situated right on the ground floor of the philology department. The Lost Weekend is not the average coffee grab and go but an über-atmospheric hybrid of a café and a bookstore. Huge windows overlooking the quirky streets of the university area, large wooden tables, bare concrete walls and an inviting book corner create a cozy yet urban surrounding, where you can easily spend a couple of hours reading or chatting with friends. Since the coffee is great (not to mention the tasty cinnamon buns and sandwiches) and the opening hours are student-friendly, my work breaks here extend in time, while my library book pile gets more and more permanently transferred to this new favourite of mine. And if I’m not in a study mode at all, I flip through some of the graphic novels in the book section, enjoy one more latte or finally start finding out about Charles R. Jackson’s novel – “The Lost Weekend”.
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Lost Weekend
3 Schellingstraße
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In every student’s life, there comes a time when things get hectic and stressful: by surprisingly fast-approaching deadlines of unloved essay assignments, growing piles of unread books for class, neglected group presentations or threatening exams. What students in Munich tend to do in such situations of academic student angst, is to enclose themselves in one of the university libraries in order to finally get work done. But there is one essential problem: you’re not allowed to bring coffee to the library! So people a more than thrilled about the newly opened “Lost Weekend”, situated right on the ground floor of the philology department. The Lost Weekend is not the average coffee grab and go but an über-atmospheric hybrid of a café and a bookstore. Huge windows overlooking the quirky streets of the university area, large wooden tables, bare concrete walls and an inviting book corner create a cozy yet urban surrounding, where you can easily spend a couple of hours reading or chatting with friends. Since the coffee is great (not to mention the tasty cinnamon buns and sandwiches) and the opening hours are student-friendly, my work breaks here extend in time, while my library book pile gets more and more permanently transferred to this new favourite of mine. And if I’m not in a study mode at all, I flip through some of the graphic novels in the book section, enjoy one more latte or finally start finding out about Charles R. Jackson’s novel – “The Lost Weekend”.
1839 King Ludwig I expresses to Joseph Anton von Maffei the desire for a first-class hotel. Maffei commissions Friedrich von Gärtner, the king's favourite architect, to do this. This extraordinary hotel has several great restaurants as well as a jazz club / bar which is open to the public. It is not uncommon for music stars to stay overnight in the grand hotel. That they also perform there is not uncommon. International jazz and blues musicians such as Marcus Miller, Pharoah Sanders, Al Jarreau, George Benson and Tito Puente have already performed in our Night Club and Festsaal. Daily 22.00 to 3.00 (except for concerts) It's the perfect place if you want experience some more exquisite atmosphere. In the summer you can also enjoy the terrace :)
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Hotel Bayerischer Hof, Munich
2-6 Promenadepl.
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1839 King Ludwig I expresses to Joseph Anton von Maffei the desire for a first-class hotel. Maffei commissions Friedrich von Gärtner, the king's favourite architect, to do this. This extraordinary hotel has several great restaurants as well as a jazz club / bar which is open to the public. It is not uncommon for music stars to stay overnight in the grand hotel. That they also perform there is not uncommon. International jazz and blues musicians such as Marcus Miller, Pharoah Sanders, Al Jarreau, George Benson and Tito Puente have already performed in our Night Club and Festsaal. Daily 22.00 to 3.00 (except for concerts) It's the perfect place if you want experience some more exquisite atmosphere. In the summer you can also enjoy the terrace :)